Carly Fiorina’s “Beautiful” Face

640px-Carly_Fiorina_at_Southern_Republican_Leadership_Conference,_Oklahoma_City,_OK_May_2015_by_Michael_Vadon_14

Bottom line is this: calling a woman in the public arena “beautiful” is nothing more than a sleazy catcall. It made Trump look like he was leaning against a brick wall, waiting for something with a good figure to walk by, disappointed it was just a successful business woman who is coincidentally a 61-year-old presidential candidate.

Carly Fiorina stole the show at the most recent Republican presidential candidates’ debate broadcast from the Ronald Reagan Library on CNN. She was reserved, focused, deliberate in her comments. It’s too soon to say whether her poll numbers will rise from the bottom of the heap, but for many voters unfamiliar with her candidacy, this was an auspicious debut. She spoke from personal experience about the impact of drug addiction on families, and she appeared calm and professional.

And then the topic of Donald Trump’s recent Rolling Stone interview came up, the one where he said, “Look at that face! Would anyone vote for that? Can you imagine that, the face of our next president?!” Trump later claimed that he didn’t really mean anything about her face, but that he was actually referring to her “persona.” Fiorina responded succinctly that “Women all over this country heard very clearly exactly what Mr. Trump said.” Well done.

It would have been gracious for Mr. Trump to walk away from this discussion, but that’s not exactly his working style. Instead, he paid her the most insulting, condescending, patronizing “compliment” possible. He said she had “a beautiful face.” It was the most offensive comment he could have made. It was, simply put, a catcall.

Trump, like many American men, believes that women like to be called beautiful. Not true, sir. In this arena, it becomes clear that when you failed to find another way to belittle Fiorina’s presidential hopes, you played the only card left in your deck – you attempted to reduce her to the general category of “girl.” I can’t say it worked. She stayed calm and professional and it must have been so confusing when she didn’t get all giggly that such a powerful and important billionaire would think she was pretty.

Ouch.

Carly Fiorina, for better or worse, is running for the office of President of the United States. Now, it’s easy to say she doesn’t have a snowball’s chance in hell, or that no voter in his or her right mind would vote for her – it’s just too soon to say anything much about her as a candidate other than that she did really well in the debate. Actually, it’s too soon to say anything definitive about any of the candidates, Republican, Democrat, or Independent.

However, do not dismiss her, Mr. Trump, by calling her “beautiful” after saying clearly to all of us that you do not find her face appealing enough to give her your vote. That is unbecoming in a way that speaks volumes about the way you see all those women you say you cherish. In fact, you couldn’t even name an American woman of historical significance when you were asked who should take the face of the ten dollar bill. You offered your daughter? And then, Rosa Parks? I can only imagine it was because your daughter also has a beautiful face?

Bottom line is this: calling a woman in the public arena “beautiful” is nothing more than a sleazy catcall. It made Trump look like he was leaning against a brick wall, waiting for something with a good figure to walk by, disappointed it was just a successful business woman who is coincidentally a 61-year-old presidential candidate.

Ironically, he played right into Carly Fiorina’s new ad campaign, recently posted by her super PAC. It’s called, “Look at This Face.”

Photo credit: “Carly Fiorina at Southern Republican Leadership Conference, Oklahoma City, OK May 2015 by Michael Vadon 14” by Michael Vadon – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Anne Born is a New York-based writer who has been writing stories and poetry since childhood.  She blogs on The Backpack Press and Tumbleweed Pilgrim and her writing focuses on family and life in a big city after growing up in a small one.  She is the author of “A Marshmallow on the Bus” and “Prayer Beads on the Train” and a photographer who specializes in photos of churches, cemeteries, and the Way of St. James in Spain.  Most of her writing is done on the bus.  www.about.me/anneborn. You can follow Anne on Wattpad, Instagram, and Twitter at @nilesite and listen to Born in the Bronx on Our Salon Radio.

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